Air Issues

  For more information or updates, please contact Robert Helminiak.


Boiler MACT and GACT

Under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, the EPA is required to establish maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards for a number of industrial sectors believed to be major emitters of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Many of these standards will directly affect the batch chemical industry. The Industrial/Commercial/Institutional (ICI) Boilers and Process Heaters MACT (Boiler MACT) is intended to regulate HAP emissions from boilers and process heaters located at major sources.

Current Status
EPA proposed reconsidered Boiler MACT and GACT rules on January 21, 2015. EPA finalized the reconsidered Boiler MACT rule on November 20, 2015.

Background on Boiler MACT.

Find more information and EPA guidance here.


Area Source Regulations
(Chemical Manufacturing Area Sources (CMAS) Rule)

(NEW – COMPLIANCE TOOL AVAILABLE TO SOCMA MEMBERS)

The area source standards to regulate emissions of air toxics are focused on emitters considered to be minor sources of pollutants – those that emit less than 10 tpy of any one hazardous air pollutant (HAP), or less than 25 tpy aggregate HAPs.

Under the Clean Air Act, EPA is required to develop a strategy for reducing the public health risk in urban areas from the 30 most-hazardous HAPs. EPA is required to identify and list the area source categories that represent 90 percent of the emissions of the at least the 30 "listed" air toxics and subject them to standards under the CAA.

EPA identified 70 area source categories, which represent 90 percent of the emissions of the listed air toxics, including chemical manufacturing.

Latest Status
EPA published its final reconsidered CMAS rule on December 21, 2012. SOCMA finalized a CMAS Audit Protocol in 2014 to help SOCMA members comply with the rule; the CMAS Protocol can be found here.

Background on Area Source Regulations.

Find more information about area source rules here.  


National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Miscellaneous Organic Chemical Manufacturing and Miscellaneous Coating Manufacturing (MON MACT)

Under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required to establish maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards for a number of industrial sectors believed to be major emitters of hazardous air pollutants (HAPS). Many of these standards will directly affect the batch chemical industry. The Miscellaneous Organic National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (MON) is intended to cover all organic chemical processes not covered by other standards such as the Hazardous Organic NESHAP. The MON was proposed in April 2002 and published in final form on November 10, 2004. For more information on the MON rule, visit EPA's website.


Climate Change 

SOCMA recognizes global climate change is a broad concern and could have far reaching effects. While overall understanding of the factors that may contribute to climate change is evolving, SOCMA agrees it is sound public and business policy to control emissions, conserve resources and minimize waste. While SOCMA member operations typically are not major contributors of greenhouse gases, as part of SOCMA’s overall commitment to environmental improvement by its members, SOCMA will continue to evaluate how members can address various concerns related to climate change.

More on SOCMA’s views on climate change.


Risk Management Program (RMP)

Most Recent Status
On March 14, 2016, EPA published its Risk Management Plan (RMP) Proposed Rule in the Federal Register. A public hearing on the proposed rule was held on March 29, and comments are due on May 13. EPA hopes to finalize an RMP rule before the end of the Obama Administration.

The proposal follows a solicitation for information from EPA. On July 31, 2014, EPA published a Request for Information for its RMP program. SOCMA submitted comments on October 29, 2014. 

Background on RMP
The Original Rule



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